FAQ

– Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) –

Q:

Where have you traveled?

TWT:

We have traveled to many destinations.

Outside of the United States, we have visited parts of Spain, France, Italy, Monaco, Greece, Turkey, Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Finland, Mexico, and Cuba.

Within the U.S., we have traveled to many States, mostly on the west coast as we are based in Las Vegas, Nevada, but we also travel to the midwest and east on business and adventure.

Q:

Where to next?

TWT:

We are considering travel potentials to parts of China, Belgium, Iceland, Russia, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, India, Antarctica, Brazil, and many other locales.

Anywhere, really. Invitations welcome!

Ideally, we seek to travel for business and journalistic purposes and recount experiences here at They Were Tasty.

As a side note, we are deeply saddened by the audacious vandalism and civil conflicts in various regions of the world as it means we will not have the opportunity to see the historical, architectural, and artistic sights of war-torn regions.

Q:

What is backpacking Europe like?

TWT:

It’s one of those things you have to experience for yourself.

Backpacking Europe was like an experiment in urban survival.

We were constantly on the move.

Most mornings we were woken by 10am housekeeping.

Some nights we had trouble finding a hotel vacancy.

Other times we were denied rooms based on our American status.

Being residents of 24 hour Las Vegas, the biggest obstacle of traveling anywhere is that cities shut down for siestas, last calls, or otherwise.

One notable experience from Athens, Greece, in 2007, we were in a bank for our daily withdrawal, the teller was smoking a cigarette at his desk, and there was no bulletproof glass between us compared to U.S. banks where smoking in businesses is prohibited, and banks encase tellers in bulletproof glass to deter robberies.

Q:

What is traveling the United States like?

TWT:

There is quite the contrast between backpacking Europe and driving the western U.S.

The major distinction is that Europe is much smaller and train travel is common.

In the U.S., the convenient highway system means more driving and less contact with other travelers.

In Europe, we would meet people everywhere.

In the U.S., most of our meetings were at sights and lodgings, so tour guides and hotel lobby staff are among those we most often interact.

Q:

What is most likable about traveling?

TWT:

Getting there. Being wherever we spend so much time traveling to.

We also enjoy making traveling companions and teaming up for the sightseeing adventure.

Then there’s that enlightening moment when we arrive at a historical site such as the Duomo in Florence, or the Pantheon in Rome, or Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and we realize how simultaneously insignificant and integral we are as components to our fellow humans.

Q:

What is least likable about traveling?

TWT:

Without trying to overshadow the merits of international travel, there are some aspects that may be unexpected for some.

For example, international bag thieves, vendors, aggressive beggars, rip-off taxi rides, compromising restrooms, illness, no vacancies, and if you have a backpack on your shoulders you may as well just consider yourself a mark.

Sometimes the ideal vacation does not live up to one’s expectations, so one must be versatile in their adventures.

Q:

What are some of the most memorable places?

TWT:

Oh, so many places on earth, and so many we have yet to visit.

Really, anywhere we share time and camaraderie with people.

We tend to visit historical monuments and art museums such as:

the Museo Picasso, Málaga,

the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam,

the Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida,

the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art,

the San Francisco Exploratorium,

the Seattle Art Museum,

Nevada State Art Museum, Reno,

the Plains Art Museum, Fargo, North Dakota

the now defunct Guggenheim, Venetian, Las Vegas.

To list a few memorable places:

anywhere with vacancies, air conditioning, and breakfast included,

the terrace at El Refugio, Cartajima, Spain,

the roadside patios of Setenil de las Bodegas, Spain,

the sunflower fields we admired from the bar car on a train from Cádiz to Barcelona, Spain,

the Monoprix, the street corner bakery croissants, and the Etap patio of Marseilles, France,

the blue luminous tunnel of Nice, France,

the view of Florence, Italy from Piazzale Michelangelo,

a Roman Centurion impersonator talking on his mobile at Trevi Fountain, Rome, Italy,

the pool at Villa Adrianne, Naxos, Greece,

the hospitality of Petrades, Greece,

the terrace at Istanbul Hostel, Istanbul, Turkey,

the breweries and bodegas of Düsseldorf, Germany,

a tasty chocolate sundae at Benton Station, Benton, California,

the Silver Bar at the Madonna Inn, San Luis Obispo, California,

and all the kind people and weary travelers we meet along the way.

Q:

Any suggestions for travelers?

TWT:

Of course!

The typical tools for survival are most important.

Pack a multi-tool, or purchase upon arrival, something with a can/bottle opener.

Pack an LED light, possibly the sort with a head band/mount.

Pack rubber sandals for showers to avoid athlete’s/backpacker’s foot.

Pack a small padlock for lockers.

Self-catering is much more cost effective than eating in restaurants, Genoa, cheese, wine, etc.

Carry documents and identification in a pouch worn under the clothing.

Expect your bank will limit daily withdrawal amounts, so you may not have funds when needed, and some debit/credit cards may not be accepted.

The green cross of the Pharmacia is your friend. If ill, be prepared to communicate your ailments.

The payphones can be difficult to use and sometimes steal your money.

Wifi may be sporadic, so internet cafes are a helpful alternative, especially for making advanced lodging reservations.

Above all, enjoy your trip! Not everyone gets to travel, so make the most of your time away!

Have any questions beyond this information?

Let us know in the comments!

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